C sharp program IO performance gets worse over time - Change of folder name resets this.. how come ?

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csharpisanote

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Hi, this is my first post here.

I'm newbie in C sharp. My programming background was approx 10 years Dos/Foxpro + 3 years Java + 15 years break not coding at all. I just started with C sharp about a week ago.

I'm learning C sharp while experimenting with a github project "PS4 Macro" [SNIPPED]. This project intercepts the PS4 controller connected to the PC + PS Remote Play software. PS4 Macro works fine by itself :- I can record the PS4 controller movements and play the macros back without any issue.

With that background, I'm trying to extend the PS4 Macro to automated some PS4 gaming tasks - instead of using the original PS4 Macro apps to manually load macros and to execute them one by one.

My test program includes a few "while (bool)" loops to wait for the macro to finish executing before continuing - it's my bad design, but was done to quickly test some ideas.

While in Visual Studio, I can code, test, Debug-Terminate All (to stop the "while" lock-ups,) all day and the performance was good.

However, when I deployed my executable to a 2nd PC, without Visual Studio, I would need to end-task the program from time to time to further test it. However, the I/O performance (disk access, reading/outputing to the PS4 controller) becomes slower over times. The performance remained bad even after a PC reboot. _But_ if I rename the program folder, performance becomes tip top again - and slowly degrades with more end-tasks that I did - and I would have to rename the test program folder again.

Any clue as to why the performance slow down won't go away even after a reboot ? Was it due to bad cache got larger and larger ?

Thanks for reading my rather long first post!
 
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Skydiver

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I am against game cheats, trainers, and hacks so I'll let others jump in on this thread.

I will say these though:
- When an app terminates on Windows, all its resources are released. Any slow down you maybe seeing after your app has been killed by task manager is due to something else. If you have paranoid antivirus that scans everything that has been touched (regardless of read or write), maybe that is what is slowing things down.
- If your game cheats installs any usermode drivers or Windows hooks, those might not be freed up or uninstalled by just termination of your app.
- As for the runtime performance slow down, check to see if you are going into garbage collection hell, or if you have a memory leak. There is a big section in MSDN as well as various online articles about best practices for .NET Framework performance.
 

Sheepings

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Sorry to disappoint. Nobody will be jumping in on these types of threads. As I've posted before, here are my reasons for not supporting these programs.

I don't agree with these cheat topics and therefore am closing this topic before it starts, and here is my reasoning.

When I worked with Electronic Arts, I had the misfortune of watching one of their better games of their early career become a destroyed product, and all because of trainers, cheats, and hacks. I was tasked to work alongside PunkBuster at the time to try to remedy to a solution to prevent the games memory addresses being manipulated by external trainers. And I have seen the damage these tools can do first hand.
  • Hacks are known to cause all kinds of instability issues for not just game servers, but the servers they operate on, and other users of that game.
  • Cheats have the capability to crash entire networks and servers. As a self employed network hosting provider, I understand the frustration these silly tools cause us.
  • Cheats, trainers, or any other hack are all violations of the EULA's of those games you are using them in.
Personally, I respect the work developers do for gaming companies. And I respect the license of the products that they are released under and so should you.
 
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