Resolved How To Override The Runtime System.dll Namespace?

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Sheepings

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Please stop apologising. :)

If you don't ask, you won't learn.

Now, go back and read post 7 again and then click on the Resource link on p/#6 and read the left top corner... :rolleyes:
 

Dalski

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Yes I understand the system.dll assembly was incorrectly being referenced from the link provided. The mscorlib assembly needed to be referenced. But I cannot for the life of me see where I could've learned this from referencing the .NET API Browser.
 

JohnH

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"reference source" is the site that provides the source code for the .Net libraries. Very hard-core codes, noone quite sane read them :)

".Net API Browser - Microsoft Docs" - here is documentation and learning material for developers. This is for all levels developers, there are also learning articles and introduction topics to be found.
 

JohnH

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Yes I understand the system.dll assembly was incorrectly being referenced from the link provided. The mscorlib assembly needed to be referenced. But I cannot for the life of me see where I could've learned this from referencing the .NET API Browser.
Don't worry about that. The core runtime library is always referenced no matter project you create.
 

Sheepings

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"reference source" is the site that provides the source code for the .Net libraries. Very hard-core codes, noone quite sane read them :)
I read them. Lol I guess that puts me in the insane category. But we all knew that :LOL:

If I want to know what object<T> is being returned and to see if I can improve on calculative performances by using an interface, I do check the references for that.
 

Dalski

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"reference source" is the site that provides the source code for the .Net libraries. Very hard-core codes, noone quite sane read them :)
I don't see how any developer could stay away from them. One of my first lessons with the Raspbery Pi was disecting the etc folder and renaming system-based commands, creating alias system commands and the like.
 

Sheepings

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Huu?

So what you're saying is you rewrote the kernel? :unsure:
 

Skydiver

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Sshh... Don't tell Linus.
 

Skydiver

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Erm if I'm being honest I did look into how memory is stored, going into the stack & the heap, then looking int assembly a little, with push, pop etc... Iteration stacks... I think I even did read up on comparisson operators assessing l-values & r-values.
Then reading up on how pdfs are stored with image maps, & how pdfs store glyphs. Trying to get to sleep but unable to sleep thinking about it, getting up in the middle of the night to read more. Reading autocad's developers document on it's filetype, the hierarchical structure of entities drawn in CAD. Don't get me wrong I'm not understanding all of it to the level you guys would, but I'm suffering of being interested in everything.
It's a disease, don't judge me :LOL:.
Ah! You're that kind of geek! Don't worry. You are in good company. I think a majority of people who are drawn into this industry naturally (rather than forced in by economics), has that innate tinkerer who has to know how stuff works. All I can recommend is have an efficient way of putting stuff on the stack as you go down one rabbit hole after another so that you can come back to what you had put on the top of your "to study" stack. For me it's more like a "heap" rather than a "stack" which makes matters worse sometimes.
 

Dalski

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So what you're saying is you rewrote the kernel? :unsure:
No not at all, we can all see that I'm no wizard, merely an enthusiast with masses of enthusiasm but lacking the brains.
One of the very first lessons on the raspberry pi official website is learning the file structure of an operating system, and involved altering the system commands; a very good lesson. If my memory serves correct it was the etc folder. I wrote it down in a book as well as I did them.

I can photograph my notes & put them up here if you think I'm telling linus :p.

I think a majority of people who are drawn into this industry naturally (rather than forced in by economics), has that innate tinkerer who has to know how stuff works.
I'd agree Skydiver, it got me from the building site into the office.
 
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Sheepings

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Sshh... Don't tell Linus.
haha - I think; after re-reading what he said, he may actually have meant something completely different. Rewriting the etc would require rewriting the kernel. Rewriting configs in the etc is completely different. RP has configs in the etc directory such as message of the day etc. no pun intended.

That made me laugh
 

jmcilhinney

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Yes I understand the system.dll assembly was incorrectly being referenced from the link provided. The mscorlib assembly needed to be referenced. But I cannot for the life of me see where I could've learned this from referencing the .NET API Browser.
The documentation for the Object class is here:


Like every type page in that documentation, it states at the top what namespace it's a member of and what assembly it's declared in. What does it say at the top of that page? I think the issue here seems to be that you don't (or didn't) understand the difference between a namespace and an assembly.
 
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